Brexit

BREXIT: What now for the Bar?

Evanna Fruithof outlines Brexit’s implications for barristers across practice area

Three months on from the UK’s seismic EU Referendum result, and with the brief respite of summer behind us, defining and dealing with the implications of the pending Brexit for the Bar is a major priority. 

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O’Brien update (4) – By His Honour John Platt

Latest developments in the O’Brien/Miller pension and money claims.

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Brexit: an important role for the courts

Proceedings have been instituted challenging the power of the Prime Minister to activate Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty without the prior consent and authority of Parliament. In the second of a series of personal opinion pieces looking at the spectrum of views within this contentious area, Jolyon Maugham QC argues that the courts have an important role to play in answering crucial questions about the role of Parliament.

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Brexit: what role do the courts have to play?

Judicial review proceedings have been instituted challenging the power of the Prime Minister to activate Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty without the prior consent and authority of Parliament. In the first of a series of personal opinion pieces looking at the spectrum of views within this contentious area, Stanley Brodie QC argues the courts have no role to play in deciding the fate of Brexit.

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Blogger profile: Waiting for Godot

Counsel speaks to Jolyon Maugham QC, the tax law blogger Waiting for Godot

Where did the inspiration come from to write the blog?

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Brexit challenge

The Lord Chief Justice will preside over the legal challenge to the Brexit process in October, the High Court has ruled.

President of the Queen’s Bench Division, Sir Brian Leveson, said the case raises matters of constitutional and national importance.

He said that any appeal from the court’s decision would go to the Supreme Court.

Those representing the government told the court that the Prime Minister, Theresa May, had made it clear that Art 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, the formal procedure for withdraw from the EU, would not be triggered before the end of the year.

The applicants assert that it would be unlawful for Art 50 to be invoked without parliamentary approval. The government, however, is expected to argue that it can be done by the Prime Minister under prerogative powers.

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Business as usual?

Sophie Nappert analyses how international arbitration in London will fare post-Brexit

Unless and until the UK formally leaves the EU, the Brexit vote – which has political and historical significance, but is not legally binding on government (the European Union Referendum Act 2015 is silent on the issue) – will have little impact on London’s status as a centre for international arbitration.

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A View from Brussels

No single market ‘à la carte’ – Evanna Fruithof reports the mood in Brussels in the aftermath of the Brexit vote

A visiting professor of EU law I know (non-UK) used to enjoy asking his students to list the six UK opt-outs from the EU. 

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New beginnings

The Bar Council is preparing for what the future might look like outside the European Union, under a new Prime Minister and a new Lord Chancellor, writes the Chairman

Usually at this time of year, with the court recess and holidays around the corner, there is little news. 

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Brexit: The Article 50 ‘trigger’

 

Nick Barber, Tom Hickman and Jeff King argue that Parliament has an indispensable role in triggering withdrawal from the European Union

As a matter of domestic constitutional law, we argue that the Prime Minister is unable to issue a declaration under Art 50 of the Lisbon Treaty – triggering withdrawal from the European Union – without having been authorised to do so by a statute. 

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